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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Jun;25(18):17915-17919. doi: 10.1007/s11356-018-1997-z. Epub 2018 Apr 21.

Phthalates and type 1 diabetes: is there any link?

Author information

1
Unit of Pediatric Endocrinology, Pediatrics Service, São João Integrated Pediatric Hospital, School of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal. Cintiacastro-correia@hotmail.com.
2
Hospital S João, Serviço de Pediatria, Alameda Hernâni Monteiro, 4200, Porto, Portugal. Cintiacastro-correia@hotmail.com.
3
REQUIMTE/LAQV-GRAQ, Institute of Engineering of Porto of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto, Portugal.
4
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
5
MEDCIDS - Department of Community Medicine, Health Information and Decision, School of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
6
Center for Research in Health Technologies and Information Systems (Centro de Investigação em Tecnologias e Serviços de Saúde - CINTESIS), Porto, Portugal.
7
Unit of Pediatric Endocrinology, Pediatrics Service, São João Integrated Pediatric Hospital, School of Medicine of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
8
Nutrition and Metabolism, NOVA Medical School, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campo dos Mártires da Pátria, 130, 1169-056, Lisbon, Portugal.

Abstract

Phthalates are a group of chemical compounds used as plasticizers in the manufacture of plastic materials. They can be present in many commonly used products. There seems to be a relationship between exposure to phthalates and the occurrence of metabolic dysfunctions, such as a decrease in glucose tolerance, oxidative stress, loss of beta cells, and a decrease in insulin synthesis. As beta cells play a key role in the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), we sought to investigate the relationship between exposure to phthalates and the diagnosis of T1DM in prepubertal children. Design concentrations of phthalate metabolites were compared in the urine of a population of prepubertal children with new-onset diabetes, patients with T1DM diagnosed more than 6 months previously, and healthy control children. Although the concentrations of DBP and DiBP metabolites were statistically identical in the new-onset diabetes, diabetes, and control groups, there was a clear trend for higher levels of DiBP metabolites in the children with new-onset diabetes. In our sample, there was a trend for higher levels of DiBP metabolites in children with new-onset diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Phthalates; Type 1 diabetes

PMID:
29680886
PMCID:
PMC6028856
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-018-1997-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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