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Anim Reprod Sci. 2018 Jun;193:158-164. doi: 10.1016/j.anireprosci.2018.04.064. Epub 2018 Apr 13.

Germ cell-specific apoptosis by extracellular clusterin in cryptorchid dog testes.

Author information

1
Research Group of Nutraceuticals for Metabolic Syndrome, Korea Food Research Institute, Jeonbuk 55365, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea.
3
Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Jeonbuk 55365, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Swine & Poultry Science, Korea National College of Agriculture and Fisheries, Jeonbuk 54874, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Beef & Dairy Science, Korea National College of Agricultures and Fisheries, Jeonbuk 54874, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: leewy81@korea.kr.

Abstract

Mammalian testes are maintained at a relatively lesser temperature than the abdominal region so that normal spermatogenesis can occur. Germ cell apoptosis has resulted in heat-damaged testes that occurs as a result of cryptorchidism, but the mechanism is not yet fully understood. To elucidate the cause of germ-cell death by cryptorchidism, cryptorchidism was surgically induced in dog testes and histological and molecular analyses were performed. Histological data indicated that the seminiferous tubules of cryptorchid testes and epididymis contained fewer germ cells. Total RNA sequencing was performed to screen for overexpressed genes in cryptorchid dog testes. Clusterin RNA was in greater abundance (approximately 12.8-fold) in cryptorchid testes than in normal testes. In addition, cleaved caspase-3 and -8 were detected in greater abundance in cryptorchid dog testes. Real time RT-PCR and western blotting analysis indicated there was a greater abundance of clusterin in cryptorchid dog testes. Furthermore, clusterin was detected in extracellular regions of cryptorchid dog testes during the 4 weeks after surgery. Thus, germ-cell specific apoptosis and expression of clusterin genes occur with a resulting presence of this protein in extracellular regions of cryptorchid dog testes. This result will facilitate further study of spermatogenesis and the specific mechanisms by which cryptorchidism results in male infertility.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Clusterin; Cryptorchidism; Dog; Germ cell

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