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Int J Colorectal Dis. 2018 Nov;33(11):1583-1588. doi: 10.1007/s00384-018-3054-2. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Transperineal rectocele repair with biomesh: updating of a tertiary refer center prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of General and Pancreatic Surgery, University of Verona, Borgo Roma, Verona, Italy. giolimas06@yahoo.it.
2
Department of General Surgery, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
3
University of Messina, Messina, Italy.
4
Department of General and Emergency Surgery, University of Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
5
Department of Surgical Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Symptomatic rectocele results in obstructed defecation and constipation. Surgical repair may provide symptomatic relief. A variety of surgical procedures have been used in the rectocele repair to enhance anatomical and functional results and to improve long-term outcomes.

METHODS:

In this prospective study, we treated 25 selected women suffering from simple symptomatic rectocele with transperineal repair using porcine dermal acellular collagen matrix Biomesh (Permacol®). Watson score and SF-36 questionnaire were used to evaluate postoperative outcomes and quality of life.

RESULTS:

Follow-up ranged from 12 to 24 months, the mean total Watson score was significantly lower than the preoperative score (P < 0.001), and every patient has improved functional outcomes. There were no major intraoperative or postoperative complications. Two cases of urinary infection and 4 patients delayed wound healing were reported. Those patients who were sexually active prior to surgery have not experienced problems with sexual function or dyspareunia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite lack of comparative study in literature, rectocele repair with Permacol® by the transperineal approach seems an effective and safe procedure that avoids some of the complications associated with synthetic mesh use.

KEYWORDS:

Biomesh; Outcomes; Simple rectocele; Transperineal repair

PMID:
29675591
DOI:
10.1007/s00384-018-3054-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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