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Science. 2018 May 11;360(6389):656-660. doi: 10.1126/science.aar3684. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Natural selection interacts with recombination to shape the evolution of hybrid genomes.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Boston, MA, USA. schumer@fas.harvard.edu mp3284@columbia.edu.
2
Harvard Society of Fellows, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
4
Centro de Investigaciones Científicas de las Huastecas "Aguazarca," Calnali, Hidalgo, Mexico.
5
Center for Computational Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
6
Department of Biology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
7
Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
8
Bioinformatics Research Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
9
Texas A&M Institute for Genome Sciences and Society, College Station, TX, USA.
10
Department of Computer Science, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
11
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.
12
Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. schumer@fas.harvard.edu mp3284@columbia.edu.
13
Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

To investigate the consequences of hybridization between species, we studied three replicate hybrid populations that formed naturally between two swordtail fish species, estimating their fine-scale genetic map and inferring ancestry along the genomes of 690 individuals. In all three populations, ancestry from the "minor" parental species is more common in regions of high recombination and where there is linkage to fewer putative targets of selection. The same patterns are apparent in a reanalysis of human and archaic admixture. These results support models in which ancestry from the minor parental species is more likely to persist when rapidly uncoupled from alleles that are deleterious in hybrids. Our analyses further indicate that selection on swordtail hybrids stems predominantly from deleterious combinations of epistatically interacting alleles.

PMID:
29674434
PMCID:
PMC6069607
DOI:
10.1126/science.aar3684
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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