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Prev Med. 2018 Jul;112:119-125. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.04.017. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

E-cigarette openness, curiosity, harm perceptions and advertising exposure among U.S. middle and high school students.

Author information

1
US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Tobacco Products, Office of Science, Silver Spring, MD, United States. Electronic address: katherine.margolis@fda.hhs.gov.
2
US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Tobacco Products, Office of Science, Silver Spring, MD, United States.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, GA, United States.

Abstract

Understanding factors associated with youth e-cigarette openness and curiosity are important for assessing probability of future use. We examined how e-cigarette harm perceptions and advertising exposure are associated with openness and curiosity among tobacco naive youth. Findings from the 2015 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS) were analyzed. The 2015 NYTS is a nationally representative survey of 17,711 U.S. middle and high school students. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates of never users of tobacco products (cigarettes, cigars/cigarillos/little cigars, waterpipe/hookah, smokeless tobacco, bidis, pipes, dissolvables, e-cigarettes) who were open to or curious about e-cigarette use, by demographics. Weighted regression models examined how e-cigarette harm perceptions and advertising exposure were associated with openness using e-cigarettes and curiosity about trying e-cigarettes. Among respondents who never used tobacco products, 23.8% were open to using e-cigarettes and 25.4% were curious. Respondents that perceived e-cigarettes cause a lot of harm had lower odds of both openness (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.15) and curiosity about e-cigarettes (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.13) compared to those with lower harm perception. Respondents who reported high exposure to e-cigarette advertising in stores had greater odds of being open to e-cigarette use (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.44) and highly curious (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.53) compared to those not highly exposed. These findings demonstrate that youth exposed to e-cigarette advertising are open and curious to e-cigarette use. These findings could help public health practitioners better understand the interplay of advertising exposure and harm perceptions with curiosity and openness to e-cigarette use in a rapidly changing marketplace.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarettes; Tobacco

PMID:
29673886
PMCID:
PMC5971002
[Available on 2019-07-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.04.017

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