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Mov Disord. 2018 Jul;33(7):1130-1138. doi: 10.1002/mds.27403. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Clinical and imaging correlates of amyloid deposition in dementia with Lewy bodies.

Author information

1
Institute for Ageing and Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2
Nuclear Medicine Department, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Amyloid deposition is common in dementia with Lewy bodies, but its pathophysiological significance is unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between amyloid deposition and clinical profile, gray matter volume, and brain perfusion in dementia with Lewy bodies.

METHODS:

Dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 37), Alzheimer's disease (n = 20), and controls (n = 20) underwent a thorough clinical assessment, 3T MRI, and early- and late-phase 18 F-Florbetapir PET-CT to assess cortical perfusion and amyloid deposition, respectively. Amyloid scans were visually categorized as positive or negative. Image analysis was carried out using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 8.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences between amyloid-positive and amyloid-negative dementia with Lewy bodies cases in age (P = .78), overall cognitive impairment (P = .83), level of functional impairment (P = .80), or any other clinical or cognitive scale. There were also no significant differences in hippocampal or gray matter volumes. However, amyloid-positive dementia with Lewy bodies cases had lower medial temporal lobe perfusion (P = .03) than amyloid-negative cases, although a combination of medial temporal lobe perfusion, hippocampal volume, and cognitive measures was unable to accurately predict amyloid status in dementia with Lewy bodies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Amyloid deposition was not associated with differences in clinical or neuropsychological profiles in dementia with Lewy bodies, but was associated with imaging evidence of medial temporal lobe dysfunction. The presence of amyloid in dementia with Lewy bodies cannot be identified on the basis of clinical and other imaging features and will require direct assessment via PET imaging or CSF. © 2018 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

KEYWORDS:

Dementia with Lewy bodies; amyloid; florbetapir; positron emission tomography

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