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J Leukoc Biol. 2018 Jul;104(1):69-83. doi: 10.1002/JLB.5MR0118-028R. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Revisiting the NIH Taskforce on the Research needs of Eosinophil-Associated Diseases (RE-TREAD).

Author information

1
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
4
Immunology Discovery, Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, California, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
6
Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Hôpital Foch, Suresnes, France.
8
Division of Allergy and Immunology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
9
Departments of Dermatology and Medicine, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
10
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
11
Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA.
12
Department of Dermatology, University of Utah Health, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
13
Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Unit, Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
14
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
15
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
16
Knopp Biosciences, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
17
Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
18
American Partnership For Eosinophilic Disorders, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
19
Department of Dermatology, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
20
Institute of Pharmacology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
21
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
22
GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
23
Institute for Lung Health, University of Leicester, Leicester, England.
24
National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

Eosinophil-associated diseases (EADs) are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by the presence of eosinophils in tissues and/or peripheral blood resulting in immunopathology. The heterogeneity of tissue involvement, lack of sufficient animal models, technical challenges in working with eosinophils, and lack of standardized histopathologic approaches have hampered progress in basic research. Additionally, clinical trials and drug development for rare EADs are limited by the lack of primary and surrogate endpoints, biomarkers, and validated patient-reported outcomes. Researchers with expertise in eosinophil biology and eosinophil-related diseases reviewed the state of current eosinophil research, resources, progress, and unmet needs in the field since the 2012 meeting of the NIH Taskforce on the Research of Eosinophil-Associated Diseases (TREAD). RE-TREAD focused on gaps in basic science, translational, and clinical research on eosinophils and eosinophil-related pathogenesis. Improved recapitulation of human eosinophil biology and pathogenesis in murine models was felt to be of importance. Characterization of eosinophil phenotypes, the role of eosinophil subsets in tissues, identification of biomarkers of eosinophil activation and tissue load, and a better understanding of the role of eosinophils in human disease were prioritized. Finally, an unmet need for tools for use in clinical trials was emphasized. Histopathologic scoring, patient- and clinician-reported outcomes, and appropriate coding were deemed of paramount importance for research collaborations, drug development, and approval by regulatory agencies. Further exploration of the eosinophil genome, epigenome, and proteome was also encouraged. Although progress has been made since 2012, unmet needs in eosinophil research remain a priority.

KEYWORDS:

biomarkers; eosinophil-related disorders; eosinophilia; hypereosinophilic syndromes; murine models; translational research

PMID:
29672914
PMCID:
PMC6171343
DOI:
10.1002/JLB.5MR0118-028R
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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