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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Apr 19;15(4). pii: E804. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15040804.

Urinary Cotinine Concentration and Self-Reported Smoking Status in 1075 Subjects Living in Central Italy.

Author information

1
INAIL, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Via di Fontana Candida 1, Monteporzio Catone, 00078 Rome, Italy. e.paci@inail.it.
2
INAIL, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Via di Fontana Candida 1, Monteporzio Catone, 00078 Rome, Italy. d.pigini@inail.it.
3
Lazio Regional Health Service, Department of Epidemiology, Via Cristoforo Colombo 112, 00147 Rome, Italy. l.bauleo@deplazio.it.
4
Lazio Regional Health Service, Department of Epidemiology, Via Cristoforo Colombo 112, 00147 Rome, Italy. c.ancona@deplazio.it.
5
Lazio Regional Health Service, Department of Epidemiology, Via Cristoforo Colombo 112, 00147 Rome, Italy. fran.forastiere@gmail.com.
6
INAIL, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Via di Fontana Candida 1, Monteporzio Catone, 00078 Rome, Italy. g.tranfo@inail.it.

Abstract

Background: Urinary cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, is a marker of tobacco smoke exposure. A cutoff value for cotinine concentration can be set to distinguish smokers from non-smokers, independently from self-declared status. Method: Cotinine was determined by isotopic dilution High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) between 2013 and 2014 on urine samples of a population of 1075 subjects. Results: 296 subjects have a cotinine level higher than 100 μg/g of creatinine (cutoff), with a median cotinine concentration of 1504.70 μg/g of creatinine. The mean is 27.5% of smokers and 60.5% in this group are females. The median value for non-smokers is 5.6 μg/g of creatinine. Two hundred and seventy-five subjects declared to be smokers in the questionnaire, but 6 (2.2%) present urinary cotinine levels lower than cutoff; 800 subjects declared to be non-smokers, but 26 of them presented urinary cotinine levels that were higher than the cutoff (3.3%). Conclusion: Using the cutoff of 100 μg/g, the misclassification of smokers resulted to be 2.2%, indicating that the selected value is suitable for studying the human exposures to environmental and occupational pollutants, including those produced by smoking.

KEYWORDS:

HPLC-MS/MS; biomarkers; cutoff; environmental tobacco smoke; smoking; urinary cotinine

PMID:
29671826
PMCID:
PMC5923846
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15040804
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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