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Medicines (Basel). 2018 Apr 18;5(2). pii: E35. doi: 10.3390/medicines5020035.

A Review of Evidence for a Therapeutic Application of Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine for Oral Diseases/Disorders.

Author information

1
Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval, 2420 Rue de la Terrasse, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. marie-pier.veilleux.4@ulaval.ca.
2
Department of Hygiene and Oral Health Science, Tokushima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan. moriyama.satomi.1@tokushima-u.ac.jp.
3
Department of Oral Health Science and Social Welfare, Tokushima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan. yoshioka.masami@tokushima-u.ac.jp.
4
Department of Hygiene and Oral Health Science, Tokushima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan. hinode@tokushima-u.ac.jp.
5
Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval, 2420 Rue de la Terrasse, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. daniel.grenier@greb.ulaval.ca.

Abstract

Kampo medicines prescribed by specialized medical practitioners and Japanese physicians have gradually reemerged in Japan as alternatives to Western medications. Kampo formulations are composed of several plant extracts and, as such, the broad variety of phytochemicals they contain likely act synergistically to provide their beneficial effects. Kampo medicines have traditionally been prescribed for a number of health conditions, including chronic hepatitis, bronchial asthma, anemia, etc. The aim of this article is to review the beneficial effects of Kampos with respect to oral health. Pertinent papers published between 1970 and 2017 were retrieved by searching in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and Scopus using key words followed by evaluation of the relevant articles. In vitro studies have identified a number of properties that give credence to the potential of Kampos for treating or preventing oral diseases/disorders. Given their anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties, they may be promising agents for controlling periodontal diseases, oral mucositis, xerostomia, and drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Since some oral diseases have a complex etiology that involves microbial pathogens and the host immune response, agents with dual functionality such as Kampo phytochemicals may offer a therapeutic advantage.

KEYWORDS:

Kampo; herbal medicines; mucositis; oral diseases; periodontal diseases; traditional medicines

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