Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Community Ment Health J. 2018 Oct;54(7):1008-1018. doi: 10.1007/s10597-018-0262-8. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Differences in Use of Government Subsidised Mental Health Services by Men and Women with Psychological Distress: A Study of 229,628 Australians Aged 45 Years and Over.

Author information

1
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Dr, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia. xenia.doljagore@newcastle.edu.au.
2
The Australian Longitudinal study on Women's Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Dr, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia. xenia.doljagore@newcastle.edu.au.
3
University of Newcastle, HMRI Building L4W, Lot 1 Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW, 2305, Australia. xenia.doljagore@newcastle.edu.au.
4
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Dr, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia.
5
The Australian Longitudinal study on Women's Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Dr, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia.
6
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH) Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, The Australian National University Building, 62 Mills Road, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia.
7
CHAMP Study Centre for Education and Research on Ageing Concord Hospital, Concord Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2300, Australia.
8
Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan Dr, Callaghan, NSW, 2308, Australia.

Abstract

This study examined factors associated with use of government subsidised mental health services by 229,628 men and women from the Sax Institute's 45 and Up Study. Logistical regression models assessed use of mental health services by gender and according to level of psychological distress. Approximately equal proportion of men and women had high psychological distress scores (approximately 7%) but only 7% of these men and 11% of these women used services. Use was associated with predisposing (younger age and higher education), enabling (private health insurance) and need factors (higher psychological distress scores). Associations were similar for men and women except urban area of residence, separated/divorced marital status, and smoking were associated with service use for women but not men. Results suggest some inequity in the use of services by those with higher levels of need and further efforts may be required to reach people with higher need but lower service use.

KEYWORDS:

Access to care; Mental health services; Severe psychosocial distress

PMID:
29667070
DOI:
10.1007/s10597-018-0262-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center