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Br J Sports Med. 2019 May;53(9):554-559. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2017-098673. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Role of kinesiophobia on pain, disability and quality of life in people suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidad de Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
2
Department of Physiotherapy, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.
3
Centre of Precision Rehabilitation for Spinal Pain (CPR Spine), School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

(1) To explore the level of association between kinesiophobia and pain, disability and quality of life in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) detected via cross-sectional analysis and (2) to analyse the prognostic value of kinesiophobia on pain, disability and quality of life in this population detected via longitudinal analyses.

DESIGN:

A systematic review of the literature including an appraisal of the risk of bias using the adapted Newcastle Ottawa Scale. A synthesis of the evidence was carried out.

DATA SOURCES:

An electronic search of PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubPsych and grey literature was undertaken from inception to July 2017.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR SELECTING STUDIES:

Observational studies exploring the role of kinesiophobia (measured with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia) on pain, disability and quality of life in people with CMP.

RESULTS:

Sixty-three articles (mostly cross-sectional) (total sample=10 726) were included. We found strong evidence for an association between a greater degree of kinesiophobia and greater levels of pain intensity and disability and moderate evidence between a greater degree of kinesiophobia and higher levels of pain severity and low quality of life. A greater degree of kinesiophobia predicts the progression of disability overtime, with moderate evidence. A greater degree of kinesiophobia also predicts greater levels of pain severity and low levels of quality of life at 6 months, but with limited evidence. Kinesiophobia does not predict changes in pain intensity.

SUMMARY/CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this review encourage clinicians to consider kinesiophobia in their preliminary assessment. More longitudinal studies are needed, as most of the included studies were cross-sectional in nature.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:

CRD42016042641.

KEYWORDS:

chronic pain; fear; musculoskeletal pain; systematic review

PMID:
29666064
DOI:
10.1136/bjsports-2017-098673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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