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Am J Health Behav. 2018 May 1;42(3):47-55. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.42.3.5.

Evaluation of Nighttime Media Use and Sleep Patterns in First-semester College Students.

Author information

1
Translational Biomedical Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA.
2
Division of Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA.
3
Department of Statistics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA.
4
Diabetes Institute and Department of Family Medicine, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens, OH, USA. gusemane@ohio.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated how nighttime media use is associated with sleep behaviors in firstsemester college students, and variation by weight status.

METHODS:

In September 2016, first-semester college students (N = 114) completed surveys evaluating nighttime media usage (NMU) and sleep behaviors. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured, and weight status was determined by body mass index.

RESULTS:

Students reported a mean sleep duration of 7.26 ± 0.93 hours. Only 33% (N = 38) reported sleeping at least 8 hours/night on average. Higher scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were correlated with reports of texting after bed (r = .199, p = .04). Total time in bed was correlated with texting in bed (r = .217, p = .026) and device-related sleep interruptions (r = .215, p = .028). Social media usage (r = 0.270, p = .005), mobile gaming (r = .208, p = .033), and texting (r = .293, p = .002) were correlated with sleep interruptions. NMU was positively correlated with weight and weight status.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest NMU is associated with reduced sleep quality.

PMID:
29663980
DOI:
10.5993/AJHB.42.3.5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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