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Clin Cancer Res. 2018 Aug 1;24(15):3500-3509. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-17-3202. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Report from the SWOG Radiation Oncology Committee: Research Objectives Workshop 2017.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Gainesville, Florida. pokunieff@ufl.edu.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Gainesville, Florida.
3
Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida.
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
5
Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
6
Departments of Radiation Oncology and Neurology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.
7
Manchester Cancer Research Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Molecular & Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.
9
Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon.
10
Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
11
Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California.
12
IMED Oncology, AstraZeneca, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
13
Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
14
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.
15
Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
16
Bay Regional Cancer Center/Advanced Urology Institute, Panama City, Florida.
17
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona.
18
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas.
19
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
20
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, California.
21
Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
22
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, North Worcester, Massachusetts.
23
Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
24
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.
25
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.
26
Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Abstract

The Radiation Therapy Committee of SWOG periodically evaluates its strategic plan in an effort to maintain a current and relevant scientific focus, and to provide a standard platform for future development of protocol concepts. Participants in the 2017 Strategic Planning Workshop included leaders in cancer basic sciences, molecular theragnostics, pharmaceutical and technology industries, clinical trial design, oncology practice, and statistical analysis. The committee discussed high-priority research areas, such as optimization of combined modality therapy, radiation oncology-specific drug design, identification of molecular profiles predictive of radiation-induced local or distant tumor responses, and methods for normal tissue-specific mitigation of radiation toxicity. The following concepts emerged as dominant questions ready for national testing: (i) what is the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of oligometastatic, oligorecurrent, and oligoprogressive disease? (ii) How can combined modality therapy be used to enhance systemic and local response? (iii) Can we validate and optimize liquid biopsy and other biomarkers (such as novel imaging) to supplement current response criteria to guide therapy and clinical trial design endpoints? (iv) How can we overcome deficiencies of randomized survival endpoint trials in an era of increasing molecular stratification factors? And (v) how can we mitigate treatment-related side effects and maximize quality of life in cancer survivors? The committee concluded that many aspects of these questions are ready for clinical evaluation and example protocol concepts are provided that could improve rates of cancer cure and quality of survival. Clin Cancer Res; 24(15); 3500-9. ©2018 AACR.

PMID:
29661779
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-17-3202
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