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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018 Jun 1;187:127-133. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.02.028. Epub 2018 Apr 11.

Relapse to smoking following release from smoke-free correctional facilities in Queensland, Australia.

Author information

1
Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Rd., Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, 4122, Australia; Queensland Alcohol and Drug Research and Education Centre, School of Public Health, University of Queensland, 288 Herston Rd, Herston, Queensland, 4006, Australia; Institute for Social Science Research, University of Queensland, 80 Meiers Rd, Indooroopilly, Queensland, 4068, Australia. Electronic address: c.puljevic@griffith.edu.au.
2
Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Rd., Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, 4122, Australia; School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Sir Fred Schonell Dr., St. Lucia, Queensland, 4072, Australia; Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research, School of Psychology and Counselling, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Centre for Children's Health Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, 4072, Australia.
3
Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Rd., Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, 4122, Australia.
4
Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, 176 Messines Ridge Rd., Mt. Gravatt, Queensland, 4122, Australia; Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 235 Bouverie St., Carlton, Victoria, 3053, Australia; School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Scenic Blvd., Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia; Mater Research Institute-UQ, University of Queensland, Aubigny Place, Raymond Terrace, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101, Australia; Centre for Adolescent Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Rd., Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement, PO Box 71304, 1008 BH, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Smoke-free prison policies are increasingly common, but few studies have investigated relapse to smoking after release from prison. This study investigated return to tobacco smoking and correlates of smoking at reduced levels after release among adults recently released from smoke-free prisons in Queensland, Australia.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey of 114 people at parole offices within two months of release from prison was used. The survey measured health, social, and criminological factors related to tobacco smoking. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with reduced post-release smoking levels compared to pre-incarceration levels.

RESULTS:

94% of participants relapsed to smoking within two months of release; 72% relapsed on the day of release. 62% of participants smoked significantly less per day after compared with before incarceration. Living with a partner (Odds Ratio (OR) 2.77, 95%CI 1.02-7.52), expressing support for smoke-free prison policies (OR 2.44, 95%CI 1.12-5.32), intending to remain abstinent post-release (OR 4.29, 95%CI 1.88-9.82), and intending to quit in the future (OR 3.88, 95%CI 1.66-9.07) were associated with reduced smoking post-release. Use of illicit drugs post-release was negatively associated with reduced smoking post-release (OR 0.27, 95%CI 0.09-0.79). In multivariate analyses, pre-release intention to remain smoke-free was associated with reduced smoking post-release (AOR 2.69, 95%CI 1.01-7.14).

DISCUSSION:

Relapse to smoking after release from smoke-free prisons is common, but many who relapse smoke less than before incarceration, suggesting that smoke-free prison policies may reduce post-release tobacco smoking. There is a need for tailored, evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions for people recently released from prison.

KEYWORDS:

Prisoners; Smoke-free policy; Tobacco use cessation; Vulnerable populations

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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