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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 May;80(5):1179-1196. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2018.03.055. Epub 2018 Apr 14.

Hair disorders in patients with cancer.

Author information

1
Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
2
The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
3
Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Department of Medicine, Division of Solid Tumor Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
4
Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
5
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida.
6
Dermatology Research Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; National Institute of Health Research Manchester Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom; Department of Dermatology, University of Munster, Munster, Germany.
7
Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: lacoutum@mskcc.org.

Abstract

Cytotoxic chemotherapies, molecularly targeted therapies, immunotherapies, radiotherapy, stem cell transplants, and endocrine therapies may lead to hair disorders, including alopecia, hirsutism, hypertrichosis, and pigmentary and textural hair changes. The mechanisms underlying these changes are varied and remain incompletely understood, hampering the development of preventive or therapeutic guidelines. The psychosocial impact of chemotherapy-induced alopecia has been well documented primarily in the oncology literature; however, the effect of other alterations, such as radiation-induced alopecia, hirsutism, and changes in hair color or texture on quality of life have not been described. This article reviews clinically significant therapy-related hair disorders in oncology patients, including the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, severity grading scales, patient-reported quality of life questionnaires, management strategies, and future translational research opportunities.

KEYWORDS:

anagen effluvium; brittleness; cancer patients; catagen effluvium; chemotherapy-induced alopecia; curling; depigmentation; eyebrow alopecia; eyelash alopecia; hair repigmentation; hirsutism; hyperpigmentation; hypertrichosis; hypopigmentation; straightening; trichomegaly

PMID:
29660422
PMCID:
PMC6186204
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2018.03.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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