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Am J Prev Med. 2018 Jun;54(6):736-745. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.03.009. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Tobacco Use and Sexual Orientation in a National Cross-sectional Study: Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Sexual Identity-Attraction Differences.

Author information

1
Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Electronic address: plius@umich.edu.
2
College of Nursing, Department of Health Systems Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
3
College of Health and Human Performance, Department of Health Education and Promotion, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.
4
Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
5
School of Nursing and Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York.
6
Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Addiction Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study is to determine the past-year prevalence estimates of any nicotine/tobacco use, cigarette smoking, and DSM-5 tobacco use disorder based on sexual identity among U.S. adults, and to examine potential variations in these estimates by age, race/ethnicity, and sexual identity-attraction concordance/discordance.

METHODS:

The 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions collected data via in-person interviews with a cross-sectional nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized adults (response rate=60.1%) and analyses for the present study were conducted in 2017.

RESULTS:

Any past-year nicotine/tobacco use, cigarette smoking, and DSM-5 tobacco use disorder were most prevalent among sexual minority-identified adults compared with heterosexual-identified adults, with notable variations based on sex, age, race/ethnicity, and sexual identity-attraction discordance. Elevated rates of any nicotine/tobacco use, cigarette smoking, and DSM-5 tobacco use disorder among sexual minorities were most prevalent among younger lesbian women and gay men, and all age groups of bisexual men and women. The odds of any nicotine/tobacco use, cigarette smoking, and DSM-5 tobacco use disorder were significantly greater among sexual identity-attraction discordant women and significantly lower among sexual identity-attraction discordant men.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings provide valuable new information about sexual minority subgroups, such as self-identified bisexual older adults and sexual identity-attraction discordant women, that appear to be at higher risk for adverse smoking-related health consequences as a result of their elevated rates of cigarette smoking. Additional attention is warranted to examine these high-risk subpopulations prospectively and, if the results are replicated with larger samples, this information can be used to target smoking-cessation and lung cancer screening efforts.

PMID:
29656916
PMCID:
PMC5962411
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2018.03.009

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