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Stress Health. 2018 Aug;34(3):440-445. doi: 10.1002/smi.2806. Epub 2018 Apr 15.

Post-traumatic stress disorder and risk of osteoporosis: A nationwide longitudinal study.

Huang WS1, Hsu JW1,2, Huang KL1,2, Bai YM1,2, Su TP1,2,3, Li CT1,2, Lin WC1,2, Chen TJ4,5, Tsai SJ1,2, Liou YJ1,2, Chen MH1,2.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Division of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

Several studies suggested a relationship between stress and related mental illnesses, such as depression and osteoporosis. However, it was unclear whether patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were at risk of developing osteoporosis in later life. In this study, 6,041 patients with PTSD and 24,164 age- or sex-matched controls were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 in our study and followed up to the end of 2011. Cases of osteoporosis were identified during the follow-up. Patients with PTSD had an elevated likelihood of developing osteoporosis (HR: 2.66, 95% CI [1.91, 3.71]) in later life compared with the controls. Sensitivity tests after excluding the first year observation (HR: 2.46, 95% CI [1.72, 3.53]) and the first 3-year observation (HR: 1.88, 95% CI [1.18, 3.01]) were consistent. Patients with PTSD had a higher risk of developing osteoporosis at an earlier age compared with those without PTSD. Further studies would be necessary to clarify the pathophysiology between PTSD and osteoporosis.

KEYWORDS:

PTSD; osteoporosis; temporal association

PMID:
29656531
DOI:
10.1002/smi.2806
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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