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Equine Vet J. 2018 Nov;50(6):848-853. doi: 10.1111/evj.12842. Epub 2018 May 7.

Evaluation of digital cryotherapy using a commercially available sleeve style ice boot in healthy horses and horses receiving i.v. endotoxin.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA.
2
Baker Institute, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, New York, USA.
3
Department of Clinical Studies, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Continuous digital cryotherapy experimentally prevents development and reduces severity of sepsis-associated laminitis. A sleeve style ice boot where ice is in direct contact with the skin, and water drains from the boot is being used clinically for distal limb cryotherapy. The degree of cooling achieved by this boot is unknown.

OBJECTIVES:

Evaluate skin and lamellar cooling after application of the ice sleeve in healthy horses, and the same horses during an endotoxaemia model.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective study, crossover design.

METHODS:

In eight healthy horses thermocouples were inserted into dorsal lamellae of both front feet, and under skin on both metacarpi. One forelimb received cryotherapy using sleeve style ice boot, with contralateral limb as control. Temperature was recorded on data logging devices at 5 min intervals during each cryotherapy session. Day 1: temperature data was collected for healthy horses. Day 2: data was collected for the same horses during i.v. administration of endotoxin.

RESULTS:

In healthy and endotoxaemic horses, the sleeve style ice boot significantly decreased mean skin (7.2°C and 5.8°C respectively) and lamellar (10.8°C and 9.6°C respectively) temperatures compared with control limbs (P<0.001). Skin and lamellar temperatures in endotoxaemic horses undergoing cryotherapy were significantly colder than in healthy horses (P = 0.01).

MAIN LIMITATIONS:

Order of treatment not randomised.

CONCLUSIONS:

The boot caused significant decreases in lamellar temperatures compared with untreated control limbs in all horses. Endotoxaemic horses had significantly colder lamellae and skin than healthy horses. This study is the first to show that a sleeve style boot, where ice does not cover the hoof, can cause significant decreases in lamellar temperatures through cooling of blood as it travels to the foot.

KEYWORDS:

digital cryotherapy; horse; lamellar temperatures; sepsis-associated laminitis; sleeve-style ice boot

PMID:
29654616
DOI:
10.1111/evj.12842
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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