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J Surg Educ. 2018 Apr 9. pii: S1931-7204(17)30548-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2018.02.010. [Epub ahead of print]

Solid, Cystic, and Tubular: Novice Ultrasound Skills Training Using a Versatile, Affordable Practice Model.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan.
2
OUWB School of Medicine, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan.
3
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan; OUWB School of Medicine, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan; Section of Trauma Surgery, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan.
4
Department of Surgery, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan; OUWB School of Medicine, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan; Marcia and Eugene Applebaum Surgical Learning Institute, Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, Michigan. Electronic address: Kathryn.Ziegler@beaumont.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In spite of the recognized benefits of ultrasound, many physicians have little experience with using ultrasound to perform procedures. Many medical schools and residency programs lack a formal ultrasound training curriculum. We describe an affordable ultrasound training curriculum and versatile, inexpensive practice model.

DESIGN:

Participants underwent a didactic session to teach the theory required to perform ultrasound-guided procedures. Motor skills were taught using a practice model incorporating analogs of common anatomic and pathologic structures into an opacified gelatin substrate.

SETTING:

The Marcia and Eugene Applebaum Simulation Learning Institute, Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI; a private nonprofit tertiary care hospital associated with the OUWB School of Medicine, Rochester, MI.

PARTICIPANTS:

The model was tested in a cohort of 50 medical students and general surgery residents.

RESULTS:

The gelatin model can be constructed for $1.03 per learner. The solid, cystic, and vascular structural analogs were readily identifiable on ultrasound and easily differentiated based on their echotextures. Eighty-four percent of participants successfully aspirated the cystic structure, 88% successfully biopsied a portion of the solid structure, and 76% successfully cannulated the tubular structure. Overall, 82% of participants achieved a passing score for the exercise based on a validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill instrument. There were no significant differences between the medical students and residents.

CONCLUSION:

This model can be used to teach basic ultrasound skills such as aspiration, biopsy, and vessel cannulation, providing a foundation for the use of ultrasound in a broad range of clinical procedures, as well as providing practice opportunities for medical students and residents to gain increased ultrasound competency and confidence.

KEYWORDS:

Practice-Based Learning and Improvement; affordable imaging phantom; biomimetic materials; gelatin; imaging phantoms; medical education; simulation; ultrasonography; ultrasound

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