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Virology. 2018 May;518:423-433. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2018.03.010. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

A giant virus infecting green algae encodes key fermentation genes.

Author information

1
Department of Oceanography, Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, 1950 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States.
2
Department of Oceanography, Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, 1950 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States. Electronic address: grieg@hawaii.edu.

Abstract

The family Mimiviridae contains uncommonly large viruses, many of which were isolated using a free-living amoeba as a host. Although the genomes of these and other mimivirids that infect marine heterokont and haptophyte protists have now been sequenced, there has yet to be a genomic investigation of a mimivirid that infects a member of the Viridiplantae lineage (green algae and land plants). Here we characterize the 668-kilobase complete genome of TetV-1, a mimivirid that infects the cosmopolitan green alga Tetraselmis (Chlorodendrophyceae). The analysis revealed genes not previously seen in viruses, such as the mannitol metabolism enzyme mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, the saccharide degradation enzyme alpha-galactosidase, and the key fermentation genes pyruvate formate-lyase and pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme. The TetV genome is the largest sequenced to date for a virus that infects a photosynthetic organism, and its genes reveal unprecedented mechanisms by which viruses manipulate their host's metabolism.

KEYWORDS:

Algal virus; Auxiliary metabolic genes; Giant virus; Green algae; Mimiviridae; NCLDV; Pyruvate formate-lyase

PMID:
29649682
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2018.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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