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Cell Host Microbe. 2018 Apr 11;23(4):523-535.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2018.03.008.

Immunization with AgTRIO, a Protein in Anopheles Saliva, Contributes to Protection against Plasmodium Infection in Mice.

Author information

1
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, The Anlyan Center for Medical Research and Education, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: srdan.dragovic@yale.edu.
2
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, The Anlyan Center for Medical Research and Education, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
3
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, The Anlyan Center for Medical Research and Education, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
5
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
6
Unité de Parasitologie et Entomologie, Département des Maladies Infectieuses, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées, Marseille, France; Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France.
7
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, The Anlyan Center for Medical Research and Education, 300 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Electronic address: erol.fikrig@yale.edu.

Abstract

Plasmodium infection begins with the bite of an anopheline mosquito, when sporozoites along with saliva are injected into a vertebrate host. The role of the host responses to mosquito saliva components in malaria remains unclear. We observed that antisera against Anopheles gambiae salivary glands partially protected mice from mosquito-borne Plasmodium infection. Specifically, antibodies to A. gambiae TRIO (AgTRIO), a mosquito salivary gland antigen, contributed to the protection. Mice administered AgTRIO antiserum showed lower Plasmodium liver burden and decreased parasitemia when exposed to infected mosquitoes. Active immunization with AgTRIO was also partially protective against Plasmodium berghei infection. A combination of AgTRIO antiserum and antibodies against Plasmodium circumsporozoite protein, a vaccine candidate, further decreased P. berghei infection. In humanized mice, AgTRIO antiserum afforded some protection against mosquito-transmitted Plasmodium falciparum. AgTRIO antiserum reduced the movement of sporozoites in the murine dermis. AgTRIO may serve as an arthropod-based target against Plasmodium to combat malaria.

KEYWORDS:

AgTRIO; Anopheles mosquito; Plasmodium; immunity; malaria; saliva

PMID:
29649443
PMCID:
PMC5998332
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2018.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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