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Eur J Immunol. 2018 Jun;48(6):1082-1084. doi: 10.1002/eji.201747324. Epub 2018 May 2.

Routinely used immunoassays do not detect circulating anti-GBM antibodies against native NC1 hexamer and EA epitope of the α3 chain of type IV collagen.

Author information

1
Laboratoire d'Immunologie, Pôle de Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
2
BNI team, TIMC-IMAG UMR5525 Université Grenoble Alpes - CNRS, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
3
Kidney Research Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
4
Service de Néphrologie, Pôle Digestif Dune, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
5
Département d'Anatomie et de Cytologie Pathologiques, Pôle de Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
6
Laboratoire d'Immunologie, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, APHP, Paris, France.
7
Division of Drug Research, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

Abstract

Detection of circulating anti-GBM antibodies has a key role for the diagnosis of Goodpasture syndrome but immunoassays using purified or recombinant alpha3(IV)NC1 as antigen do not recognize all anti-GBM antibodies. We show that anti-GBM antibodies directed against epitopes in their native conformation or cryptic epitopes are detected by indirect immunofluorescence.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-GBM antibodies; Glomerular basal membrane; Glomerulonephritis; Goodpasture syndrome; Indirect immunofluorescence

PMID:
29644627
DOI:
10.1002/eji.201747324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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