Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Apr 11;8(1):5827. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-24048-0.

Genetic homogeneity of goat malaria parasites in Asia and Africa suggests their expansion with domestic goat host.

Author information

1
Veterinary Parasitology Research Group, The Veterinary Parasitology Unit, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand.
2
Animal Vector-Borne Disease Research Group, The Veterinary Parasitology Unit, Department of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand.
3
Department of Protozoology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan.
4
Department of Parasitology and Entomology, Faculty of Public Health, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand.
5
Department of Clinical Medicine, Mount Kenya University, PO Box, 342-01000, Thika, Kenya.
6
Laboratory of Parasitology, Graduate School of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0818, Japan.
7
Department of Pathology, Parasitology and Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Sudan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 204, Khartoum, Sudan.
8
Department of Clinical Science, University of Zabol, Veterinary Faculty, PO box +9861335856, Zabol, Iran.
9
School of Agricultural Resources, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Pathumwan, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand.
10
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Rajamangala University of Technology Tawan-Ok 43 Moo 6 Bangpra, Sriracha District, Chonburi, 20110, Thailand.
11
Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Rajamangala University of Technology Tawan-Ok 43 Moo 6 Bangpra, Sriracha District, Chonburi, 20110, Thailand.
12
Livestock Office of Phetchaburi Province, Department of Livestock Development, Phetchaburi, 76000, Thailand.
13
Livestock Office of Kaeng Krachan District, Department of Livestock Development, Phetchaburi, 76180, Thailand.
14
Department of Animal Health and Production, School of Pure and Applied Sciences, Mount Kenya University, P O Box, 342-01000, Thika, Kenya.
15
Department of Pharmacology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, 15013, Myanmar.
16
Rector Office, University of Veterinary Science, Nay Pyi Taw, 15013, Myanmar.
17
Abrar Research and Training Centre, Abrar University, Mogadishu, Somalia.
18
National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido, 080-8555, Japan.
19
Research Center for Global Agromedicine, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido, 080-8555, Japan.
20
Department of Protozoology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan. masahitoasada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.
21
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan. masahitoasada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.
22
Department of Protozoology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (NEKKEN), Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan. okaneko@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.
23
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8523, Japan. okaneko@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Plasmodium was first identified in a goat in Angola in 1923, and only recently characterized by DNA isolation from a goat blood sample in Zambia. Goats were first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent approximately 10,000 years ago, and are now globally distributed. It is not known if the Plasmodium identified in African goats originated from parasites circulating in the local ungulates, or if it co-evolved in the goat before its domestication. To address this question, we performed PCR-based surveillance using a total of 1,299 goat blood samples collected from Sudan and Kenya in Africa, Iran in west Asia, and Myanmar and Thailand in southeast Asia. Plasmodium DNA was detected from all locations, suggesting that the parasite is not limited to Africa, but widely distributed. Whole mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed that there was only one nucleotide substitution between Zambian/Kenyan samples and others, supporting the existence of a goat-specific Plasmodium species, presumably Plasmodium caprae, rather than infection of goats by local ungulate malaria parasites. We also present the first photographic images of P. caprae, from one Kenyan goat sample.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center