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Nutrients. 2018 Apr 7;10(4). pii: E462. doi: 10.3390/nu10040462.

Should We Prescribe More Protein to Critically Ill Patients?

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada. dkh2@queensu.ca.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada. dkh2@queensu.ca.
3
Clinical Evaluation Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7, Canada. dkh2@queensu.ca.
4
Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT 05405, USA. Renee.Stapleton@uvm.edu.
5
Biobehavioral Research Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. compherc@nursing.upenn.edu.

Abstract

In the context of critical illness, evidence suggests that exogenous protein/amino acid supplementation has the potential to favorably impact whole-body protein balance. Whether this translates into retention of muscle, greater muscle strength, and improved survival and physical recovery of critically ill patients remains uncertain. The purpose of this brief commentary is to provide an overview of the clinical evidence for and against increasing protein doses and to introduce two new trials that will add considerably to our evolving understanding of protein requirements in the critically ill adult patient.

KEYWORDS:

EFFORT trial; NEXIS trial; critical care nutrition; critically ill; high protein; protein supplementation

PMID:
29642451
PMCID:
PMC5946247
DOI:
10.3390/nu10040462
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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