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J Asthma. 2019 Apr;56(4):369-379. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2018.1463379. Epub 2018 May 1.

Association of secondhand smoke exposure with asthma symptoms, medication use, and healthcare utilization among asthmatic adolescents.

Author information

1
a School of Human Services, University of Cincinnati , Cincinnati , OH , USA.
2
b Department of Environmental Health , University of Cincinnati , Cincinnati , OH , USA.
3
c Division of Emergency Medicine , Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati , Cincinnati , OH , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) and asthma symptoms, medication use, and emergency department (ED)/urgent care (UC) utilization among adolescents.

METHODS:

We performed a secondary cross-sectional analysis of Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study Wave 2 (2014-2015) including asthmatic adolescents (N = 2198). Logistic regression models and Poisson regression models were built.

RESULTS:

Participants with SHSe ≥1 hour in the past 7 days were at increased risk of reporting shortness of breath and harder to exercise aOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.43), wheezing (aOR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56), wheezing disturbing sleep (aOR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.35-2.63), wheezing during/after exercise (aOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.19-1.66), wheezing limiting speech (aOR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.55-2.86), dry cough at night (aOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.54-2.24), and asthma symptoms disturbing sleep (aOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.81-2.79). Participants with SHSe ≥1 hour were more likely to take asthma medications (aOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03-1.52), including steroids (aOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.19-2.91), oxygen therapy (aOR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.82-4.54), and controlling medications (aOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.24-1.82). Symptoms and medications varied by living with a smoker and home SHSe. Participants with SHSe were at increased risk of having a higher number of asthma attacks that required steroid use. Participants who lived with a smoker and had home SHSe were at increased risk of having higher ED/UC visits for asthma.

CONCLUSIONS:

SHSe reduction efforts are needed for asthmatic adolescents, and EDs/UCs are promising venues.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; asthma symptoms; environmental tobacco smoke exposure; epidemiology; secondhand smoke; tobacco abuse; urgent care

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