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Dev Cogn Neurosci. 2018 Aug;32:121-129. doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Current, future and potential use of mobile and wearable technologies and social media data in the ABCD study to increase understanding of contributors to child health.

Author information

1
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: kbagot@ucsd.edu.
2
Penn State University, 507 Oswald Tower, University Park, PA, 16802, USA. Electronic address: sxm27@psu.edu.
3
University of Tennessee, Henson Hall, 213 Knoxville, Knoxville, TN, 37996-3332, USA. Electronic address: mmason29@utk.edu.
4
Medical University of South Carolina, 125 Doughty Street, Suite 190, MSC861, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA. Electronic address: squegli@musc.edu.
5
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: fowler@ucsd.edu.
6
Medical University of South Carolina, 125 Doughty Street, Suite 190, MSC861, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA. Electronic address: graykm@musc.edu.
7
University of Southern California, 2011 N Soto St., Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. Electronic address: herting@usc.edu.
8
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA.
9
SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA. Electronic address: ian.colrain@sri.com.
10
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: jgodino@ucsd.edu.
11
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: stapert@ucsd.edu.
12
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: sandrabrown@ucsd.edu.
13
University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, 92093, USA. Electronic address: kpatrick@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Mobile and wearable technologies and novel methods of data collection are innovating health-related research. These technologies and methods allow for multi-system level capture of data across environmental, physiological, behavioral, and psychological domains. In the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, there is great potential for harnessing the acceptability, accessibility, and functionality of mobile and social technologies for in-vivo data capture to precisely measure factors, and interactions between factors, that contribute to childhood and adolescent neurodevelopment and psychosocial and health outcomes. Here we discuss advances in mobile and wearable technologies and methods of analysis of geospatial, ecologic, social network and behavioral data. Incorporating these technologies into the ABCD study will allow for interdisciplinary research on the effects of place, social interactions, environment, and substance use on health and developmental outcomes in children and adolescents.

KEYWORDS:

ABCD; Child development; Child health; Mobile technology; Social media; Wearable sensors

PMID:
29636283
PMCID:
PMC6447367
DOI:
10.1016/j.dcn.2018.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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