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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Apr 24;115(17):4483-4488. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1721694115. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

β-Amyloid accumulation in the human brain after one night of sleep deprivation.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuroimaging, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892; ehsan.shokrikojori@nih.gov gene-jack.wang@nih.gov nvolkow@nida.nih.gov.
2
Laboratory of Neuroimaging, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.
3
Piramal Pharma Inc., Boston, MA 02108.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510.

Abstract

The effects of acute sleep deprivation on β-amyloid (Aβ) clearance in the human brain have not been documented. Here we used PET and 18F-florbetaben to measure brain Aβ burden (ABB) in 20 healthy controls tested after a night of rested sleep (baseline) and after a night of sleep deprivation. We show that one night of sleep deprivation, relative to baseline, resulted in a significant increase in Aβ burden in the right hippocampus and thalamus. These increases were associated with mood worsening following sleep deprivation, but were not related to the genetic risk (APOE genotype) for Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, baseline ABB in a range of subcortical regions and the precuneus was inversely associated with reported night sleep hours. APOE genotyping was also linked to subcortical ABB, suggesting that different Alzheimer's disease risk factors might independently affect ABB in nearby brain regions. In summary, our findings show adverse effects of one-night sleep deprivation on brain ABB and expand on prior findings of higher Aβ accumulation with chronic less sleep.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; beta amyloid; glymphatic system; hippocampus; sleep

PMID:
29632177
PMCID:
PMC5924922
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1721694115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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