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J Cancer Prev. 2018 Mar;23(1):18-24. doi: 10.15430/JCP.2018.23.1.18. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Comparative Effects of Curcumin and Tetrahydrocurcumin on Dextran Sulfate Sodium-induced Colitis and Inflammatory Signaling in Mice.

Author information

1
Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Functional Food and Biotechnology, College of Medical Science, Jeonju University, Jeonju, Korea.
3
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, College of Knowledge-based Services Engineering, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Background:

Curcumin, a yellow ingredient of turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, Zingiberaceae), has long been used in traditional folk medicine in the management of inflammatory disorders. Although curcumin has been reported to inhibit experimentally-induced colitis and carcinogenesis, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved.

Methods:

Murine colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) which mimics inflammatory bowel disease. Curcumin or tetrahydrocurcumin was given orally (0.1 or 0.25 mmol/kg body weight daily) for 7 days before and together with DSS administration (3% in tap water). Collected colon tissue was used for histologic and biochemical analyses.

Results:

Administration of curcumin significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis and the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 as well as expression of COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In contrast to curcumin, its non-electrophilic analogue, tetrahydrocurcumin has much weaker inhibitory effects.

Conclusions:

Intragastric administration of curcumin inhibited the experimentally induced murine colitis, which was associated with inhibition of pro-inflammatory signaling mediated by NF-κB and STAT3.

KEYWORDS:

Curcumin; Dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis; NF-κB; STAT3; Tetrahydrocurcumin

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST No potential conflicts of interest were disclosed.

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