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Psychiatry Res. 2018 Jun;264:85-90. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.03.050. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Comparing predictors of employment in Individual Placement and Support: A longitudinal analysis.

Author information

1
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, 85 Mechanic Street, Suite C3-1, Box 4A, Lebanon, NH 03766, United States. Electronic address: Justin.D.Metcalfe.GR@Dartmouth.edu.
2
Westat Inc., 1600 Research Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850, United States. Electronic address: RILEYJ@WESTAT.com.
3
Boston University, Department of Occupational Therapy, Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 940 Commonwealth Avenue, West, Boston, MA 02215, United States. Electronic address: mcgurk@bu.edu.
4
Social Security Administration, Office of Retirement and Disability Policy, Baltimore, United States. Electronic address: tom.hale@ssa.gov.
5
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, 85 Mechanic Street, Suite C3-1, Box 4A, Lebanon, NH 03766, United States; Westat Inc., 85 Mechanic Street, Suite C3-1, Box 4A, Lebanon, NH 03766, United States. Electronic address: Robert.E.Drake@Dartmouth.edu.
6
Westat Inc., 85 Mechanic Street, Suite C3-1, Box 4A, Lebanon, NH 03766, United States. Electronic address: garybond@westat.com.

Abstract

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidence-based model of supported employment for people with serious mental illness. We assessed the effects and relative contributions of predictors of employment among IPS recipients using measures of baseline client characteristics, local economic context, and IPS fidelity. A recent work history, less time on the Social Security rolls, greater cognitive functioning, and a lower local unemployment rate were associated with greater probability of employment. The ability of the model to discriminate between outcomes was limited, and substantial improvements in our understanding of IPS employment outcomes will require the study of novel client, environmental, and IPS implementation factors.

KEYWORDS:

Employment; Employment, supported; Mental health; Mood disorders; Rehabilitation, vocational; Schizophrenia; Social security

PMID:
29627701
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2018.03.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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