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Pharmacol Rep. 2018 Jun;70(3):434-438. doi: 10.1016/j.pharep.2017.11.009. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Slower nicotine metabolism among postmenopausal Polish smokers.

Author information

1
Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy with the Division of Laboratory Medicine in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University and affiliated with Center for the Study of Tobacco Products, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA. Electronic address: leon.kosmider@gmail.com.
2
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.
3
Battelle Public Health Center for Tobacco Research, Baltimore, USA.
4
Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy with the Division of Laboratory Medicine in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; Institute of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health and Medical University of Silesia, Sosnowiec, Poland.
5
Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
6
Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A non-invasive phenotypic indicator of the rate of nicotine metabolism is nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) defined as a ratio of two major metabolites of nicotine - trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine. The rate of nicotine metabolism has important clinical implications for the likelihood of successful quitting with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). We conducted a study to measure NMR among Polish smokers.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study of 180 daily cigarette smokers (42% men; average age 34.6±13.0), we collected spot urine samples and measured trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC) and cotinine levels with LC-MS/MS method. We calculated NMR (molar ratio) and analyzed variations in NMR among groups of smokers.

RESULTS:

In the whole study group, an average NMR was 4.8 (IQR 3.4-7.3). The group of women below 51 years had significantly greater NMR compared to the rest of the population (6.4; IQR 4.1-8.8 vs. 4.3; IQR 2.8-6.4). No differences were found among group ages of male smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is a first study to describe variations in nicotine metabolism among Polish smokers. Our findings indicate that young women metabolize nicotine faster than the rest of population. This finding is consistent with the known effects of estrogen to induce CYP2A6 activity. Young women may require higher doses of NRT or non-nicotine medications for most effective smoking cessation treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Menopause; Nicotine; Nicotine metabolism; Nicotine metabolite ratio; Smokers

PMID:
29627689
DOI:
10.1016/j.pharep.2017.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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