Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Behav Med. 2018 Aug;41(4):458-466. doi: 10.1007/s10865-018-9922-y. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Experiences of stigma and health care engagement among Black MSM newly diagnosed with HIV/STI.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP), University of Connecticut, 2006 Hillside Rd, Storrs, CT, 06269-1248, USA. lisaanne.eaton@gmail.com.
2
Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
3
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP), University of Connecticut, 2006 Hillside Rd, Storrs, CT, 06269-1248, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
5
School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Rates of HIV/STI transmission among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) are alarmingly high and demand urgent public health attention. Stigma related concerns are a key barrier to accessing health care and prevention tools, yet limited research has been focused in this area. Experiences of stigma related to health care were evaluated among 151 BMSM residing in the Atlanta, GA area, both prior to and post HIV or STI diagnosis in a longitudinal study (data collected from 2014 to 2016). Findings demonstrated that inadequate health care engagement is associated with post-diagnosis anticipated stigma (b = - 0.38, SE  = 0.17 p  ≤ .05). Pre-diagnosis prejudice is a predictor of post-diagnosis enacted (b = 0.39, SE = 0.14, p < .01), anticipated (b = .28, SE = 0.14, p < .05), and internalized (b = .22, SE  = 0.06, p < .001) stigmas. This study is the first of its kind to assess experiences of stigma among BMSM during a critical time (i.e., before and after diagnosis) for HIV/STI prevention and treatment. Results provide a novel understanding of how stigma unfolds over-time and provide direction for stigma intervention development.

KEYWORDS:

Black men who have sex with men; HIV/STI; Stigma

PMID:
29626312
PMCID:
PMC6031458
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10865-018-9922-y

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center