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Clin Transl Oncol. 2018 Oct;20(10):1289-1301. doi: 10.1007/s12094-018-1860-1. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

Childhood and adolescent lymphoma in Spain: incidence and survival trends over 20 years.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry, Oncology Coordination Plan, Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona, Spain. rmarcos@iconcologia.net.
2
Research Group on Statistics, Econometrics and Health (GRECS), University of Girona, Girona, Spain. rmarcos@iconcologia.net.
3
Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry, Oncology Coordination Plan, Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona, Spain.
4
Research Group on Statistics, Econometrics and Health (GRECS), University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
5
CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
6
Tarragona Cancer Registry, Foundation Society for Cancer Research and Prevention (FUNCA), Reus, Spain.
7
Pere Virgili Health Research Institute, Reus, Spain.
8
Rovira i Virgili University (URV), Reus, Spain.
9
Department of Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
10
Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Working Group, Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (SEHOP), Madrid, Spain.
11
University Hospital Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla, Spain.
12
Hodgkin Lymphoma Working Group, Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, (SEHOP), Madrid, Spain.
13
Albacete Cancer Registry, Health and Social Welfare Authority, Albacete, Spain.
14
Asturias Cancer Registry. Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
15
Childhood Cancer Registry of the C. Valenciana, Public Health Directorate, Health Department, Government of C.Valenciana, Valencia, Spain.
16
Basque Country Cancer Registry, Basque Government, Bilbao, Spain.
17
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
18
Mallorca Cancer Registry, Epidemiology Department, Directorate-General of Public Health and Participation, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
19
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia University, Murcia, Spain.
20
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
21
IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
22
Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza, Spain.
23
Centre of Public Health Research-FISABIO, Valencia, Spain.
24
Department of Health and Social Sciences, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
25
IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
26
Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumours (RETI-SEHOP), University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lymphoma is the third most common malignancy in children (0-14 years) and the first in adolescents (15-19 years). This population-based study-the largest ever done in Spain-analyses incidence and survival of lymphomas among Spanish children and adolescents.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

1664 lymphoma cases (1983-2007) for incidence and 1030 for survival (1991-2005) followed until 31/12/2010, were provided by 11 cancer registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (ASRw) to the world standard population were obtained; incidence trends were modelled using the Joinpoint programme, observed survival (OS) was estimated with Kaplan-Meier and trends tested with a log-rank test. Results are presented according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer-3.

RESULTS:

In Spain, the ASRw0-14 for lymphomas was 17.5 per 1.000.000 child-years and 50.0 the specific rate for adolescents. Overall incidence increased significantly during 1983-1997 with no increases thereafter. Patients over 9 years old showed significant rising trends for all subtypes, except for Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in adolescents. During 2001-2005 (age 0-19 years), 5-year OS was 94 (90-98), 73 (64-83) and 86 (78-94) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and BL, respectively. No improvement in survival was found. The incidence in Spain was higher than overall European rates, but within the range of that in Southern Europe. Comparing OS in Spain 1991-1995 and 2001-2005 with results for Europe of the Automated Childhood Cancer Information System (ACCIS) (1988-1997) and the European cancer registry-based study on survival and care of cancer patients (EUROCARE) (2000-2007), it was similar for HL and lower for NHL and BL.

CONCLUSIONS:

Systematic monitoring and analysis of lymphoma paediatric data would provide clinical and epidemiological information to improve the health care of these patients and the outcomes for these malignancies in Spain.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer registry; Childhood and adolescent cancer; Incidence; Lymphoma; Population based; Spain; Survival

PMID:
29623582
DOI:
10.1007/s12094-018-1860-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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