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J Immigr Minor Health. 2019 Apr;21(2):372-382. doi: 10.1007/s10903-018-0732-7.

Implementation of a Stress Intervention with Latino Immigrants in a Non-traditional Migration City.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, PO Box 2120376, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0376, USA. Farrah.jacquez@uc.edu.
2
Division of Emergency Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, PO Box 2120376, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0376, USA.

Abstract

Stress negatively impacts health outcomes across all racial and ethnic groups, but the health disparities experienced by Latino immigrants in nontraditional migration cities are exacerbated by undeveloped infrastructure and weak social support networks. Immigrants in new migration cities can be difficult to engage in health interventions and are therefore underrepresented in the very research where their inclusion is most crucial. To effectively engage Latino immigrants, a team of academic and community researchers collaborated on a community-based participatory research project to design and implement a stress and coping intervention. Top stressors reported were family, children, and work, but health was most commonly identified as the primary stressor. Participants overwhelmingly chose physical activity goals for stress reduction. Pre- to post- intervention results revealed significant improvements in social support and stress management. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a peer-led, community-partnered approach to implementing a stress intervention with Latino immigrants in a nontraditional migration city.

KEYWORDS:

Community-based participatory research; Immigrants; Latino(a); New migration cities; Social support; Stress intervention; Stress management

PMID:
29623527
DOI:
10.1007/s10903-018-0732-7

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