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BMC Microbiol. 2018 Apr 5;18(1):28. doi: 10.1186/s12866-018-1169-9.

Modulations in the offspring gut microbiome are refractory to postnatal synbiotic supplementation among juvenile primates.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
2
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
3
Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR, 97239, USA.
4
Biology Department, University of Portland, Portland, OR, 97203, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. aagaardt@bcm.edu.
7
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. aagaardt@bcm.edu.
8
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. aagaardt@bcm.edu.
9
Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR, 97239, USA. aagaardt@bcm.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We and others have previously shown that alterations in the mammalian gut microbiome are associated with diet, notably early life exposure to a maternal high fat diet (HFD). Here, we aimed to further these studies by examining alterations in the gut microbiome of juvenile Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) that were exposed to a maternal HFD, weaned onto a control diet, and later supplemented with a synbiotic comprised of psyllium seed and Enterococcus and Lactobacillus species.

RESULTS:

Eighteen month old offspring (n = 7) of 36% HFD fed dams were fed a control (14% fat) diet post weaning, then were synbiotic supplemented for 75 days and longitudinal stool and serum samples were obtained. All stool samples were subjected to 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing, and microbiome profiles and serum lipids and triglycerides were compared to untreated, healthy age matched and diet matched controls (n = 7). Overall, 16S-based metagenomic analysis revealed that supplementation exerted minimal alterations to the gut microbiome including transient increased abundance of Lactobacillus species and decreased abundance of few bacterial genera, including Faecalibacterium and Anaerovibrio. However, serum lipid analysis revealed significant decreases in triglycerides, cholesterol, and LDL (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, supplemented juveniles challenged 4 months later were not protected from HFD-induced gut dysbiosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Synbiotic supplementation is temporally associated with alterations in the gut microbiome and host lipid profiles of juvenile Japanese macaques that were previously exposed to a maternal HFD. Despite these presumptive temporal benefits, a protective effect against later HFD-challenge gut dysbiosis was not observed.

KEYWORDS:

Dysbiosis; Microbiome; Non-human primate; Probiotic, synbiotic

PMID:
29621980
PMCID:
PMC5887201
DOI:
10.1186/s12866-018-1169-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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