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PLoS One. 2018 Apr 5;13(4):e0194986. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194986. eCollection 2018.

Trends in congenital anomalies in Europe from 1980 to 2012.

Author information

1
Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
2
Faculty Life & Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Woman-Mother-Child, University Hospital Center CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Public Health Division of, Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain.
5
Department of Medical Genetics and Reproductive Health,Children's Hospital Zagreb, Medical School University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
6
Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
7
National Public Health and Medical Officer Service, Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry, Budapest, Hungary.
8
Centro de Estudos e registo de A C, Lisbon, Portugal.
9
Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
10
Paediatric department, Hospital Lillebaelt, Kolding, Denmark.
11
Directorate for Health Information and Research, Guardamangia, Malta.
12
Paris Registry of Congenital Anomalies, Inserm UMR 1153, Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology Research Team, Center for Epidemiology and Statistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
13
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
14
Division for mental and physical health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bergen, Norway.
15
Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Kilkenny, Ireland.
16
Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Dublin, Ireland.
17
Provincial Institute for Hygiene, Antwerp, Belgium.
18
IMER Registry, Center for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
19
Azienda Ospedaliero- Universitaria di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
20
Department of Public Health, Health Service Executive, Cork, Ireland.
21
CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa, Italy.
22
Center for child and adolescence medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
23
Registre des Malformations Congenitales de la Reunion, St Pierre, Ile de la Reunion, France.
24
Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
25
Malformation Monitoring Centre Saxony-Anhalt, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
26
National Perinatal and Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
27
Public Health Wales, Swansea, United Kingdom.
28
Center for Human Genetics,Institut de Pathologie at de Genetique, Charleroi, Belgium.
29
University of Southampton and Wessex Clinical Genetics Service, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surveillance of congenital anomalies is important to identify potential teratogens.

METHODS:

This study analysed the prevalence of 61 congenital anomaly subgroups (excluding chromosomal) in 25 population-based EUROCAT registries (1980-2012). Live births, fetal deaths and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly were analysed with multilevel random-effects Poisson regression models.

RESULTS:

Seventeen anomaly subgroups had statistically significant trends from 2003-2012; 12 increasing and 5 decreasing.

CONCLUSIONS:

The annual increasing prevalence of severe congenital heart defects, single ventricle, atrioventricular septal defects and tetralogy of Fallot of 1.4% (95% CI: 0.7% to 2.0%), 4.6% (1.0% to 8.2%), 3.4% (1.3% to 5.5%) and 4.1% (2.4% to 5.7%) respectively may reflect increases in maternal obesity and diabetes (known risk factors). The increased prevalence of cystic adenomatous malformation of the lung [6.5% (3.5% to 9.4%)] and decreased prevalence of limb reduction defects [-2.8% (-4.2% to -1.5%)] are unexplained. For renal dysplasia and maternal infections, increasing trends may be explained by increased screening, and deceases in patent ductus arteriosus at term and increases in craniosynostosis, by improved follow up period after birth and improved diagnosis. For oesophageal atresia, duodenal atresia/stenosis and ano-rectal atresia/stenosis recent changes in prevalence appeared incidental when compared with larger long term fluctuations. For microcephaly and congenital hydronephrosis trends could not be interpreted due to discrepancies in diagnostic criteria. The trends for club foot and syndactyly disappeared once registries with disparate results were excluded. No decrease in neural tube defects was detected, despite efforts at prevention through folic acid supplementation.

PMID:
29621304
PMCID:
PMC5886482
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0194986
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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