Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Sci (Weinh). 2018 Jan 2;5(2):1700449. doi: 10.1002/advs.201700449. eCollection 2018 Feb.

Modularized Extracellular Vesicles: The Dawn of Prospective Personalized and Precision Medicine.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital 600 Yishan Road Shanghai 200233 China.
2
Institute of Microsurgery on Extremities Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital 600 Yishan Road Shanghai 200233 China.

Abstract

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are ubiquitous nanosized membrane vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer enclosing proteins and nucleic acids, which are active in intercellular communications. EVs are increasingly seen as a vital component of many biological functions that were once considered to require the direct participation of stem cells. Consequently, transplantation of EVs is gradually becoming considered an alternative to stem cell transplantation due to their significant advantages, including their relatively low probability of neoplastic transformation and abnormal differentiation. However, as research has progressed, it is realized that EVs derived from native-source cells may have various shortcomings, which can be corrected by modification and optimization. To date, attempts are made to modify or improve almost all the components of EVs, including the lipid bilayer, proteins, and nucleic acids, launching a new era of modularized EV therapy through the "modular design" of EV components. One high-yield technique, generating EV mimetic nanovesicles, will help to make industrial production of modularized EVs a reality. These modularized EVs have highly customized "modular design" components related to biological function and targeted delivery and are proposed as a promising approach to achieve personalized and precision medicine.

KEYWORDS:

drug delivery; extracellular vesicles; modular design; nanovesicles; nucleic acids; targeting

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center