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Int Orthop. 2018 Aug;42(8):1967-1973. doi: 10.1007/s00264-018-3915-x. Epub 2018 Apr 2.

Paediatric musculoskeletal disease in Kumi District, Uganda: a cross-sectional survey.

Author information

1
Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Program, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of British Columbia, Victoria, Canada.
4
Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
5
Kumi Hospital, Kumi, Uganda.
6
University of California San Francisco Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, Oakland, CA, USA. Coleen.Sabatini@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to estimate the burden of musculoskeletal disease among children treated in Kumi District, Uganda, to inform training, capacity-building efforts, and resource allocation.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective cohort study by reviewing the musculoskeletal (MSK) clinic and community outreach logs for children (age < 18 years) seen at Kumi Hospital in Kumi, Uganda, between January 2013 and December 2015. For each patient, we recorded the age, sex, diagnosis, and treatment recommendation.

RESULTS:

Of the 4852 children, the most common diagnoses were gluteal and quadriceps contractures (29.4% (95% CI 28.1-30.7%), 96% of which were gluteal fibrosis), post-injection paralysis (12.7% (95% CI 11.8-13.6%)), infection (10.5% (95% CI 9.7-11.4%)), trauma (6.9% (95% CI 6.2-7.6%)), cerebral palsy (6.9% (95% CI 6.2-7.7%)), and clubfoot (4.3% (95% CI 3.8-4.9%)). Gluteal fibrosis, musculoskeletal infections, and angular knee deformities create a large surgical burden with 88.1%, 59.1%, and 54.1% of patients seen with these diagnoses referred for surgery, respectively. Post-injection paralysis, clubfoot, and cerebral palsy were treated non-operatively in over 75% of cases.

CONCLUSION:

While population-based estimates of disease burden and resource utilization are needed, this data offers insight into burden of musculoskeletal disease for this region of Sub-Saharan Africa. We estimate that 50% of the surgical conditions could be prevented with policy changes and education regarding injection practices and early care for traumatic injuries, clubfeet, and infection. This study highlights a need to increase capacity to care for specific musculoskeletal conditions, including gluteal fibrosis, post-injection paralysis, infection, and trauma in the paediatric population of Uganda.

KEYWORDS:

Gluteal fibrosis; MSK burden; Pediatric musculoskeletal health; Pediatric orthopaedics; Post-injection paralysis; Uganda

PMID:
29610937
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-018-3915-x

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