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J Clin Biochem Nutr. 2018 Mar;62(2):167-173. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.17-97. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Dietary intake of inorganic phosphorus has a stronger influence on vascular-endothelium function than organic phosphorus.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, 1-1-12 Shinzaike-Honcho, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0092, Japan.
2
School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo, 1-1-12 Shinzaike-Honcho, Himeji, Hyogo 670-0092, Japan.

Abstract

Phosphorus management through dietetic therapy is vital for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. There are two main sources of phosphorus in the diet, organic phosphorus from protein and inorganic phosphorus from food additives. The adverse effects of high phosphorus intake on vascular-endothelium function have been reported; however, the differences in the effects of organic phosphorus versus inorganic phosphorus are not clear. In this study, we examined an acute effect of these high phosphorus meals intake on vascular-endothelium function. This was a randomized, double-blind, cross-over test study design targeting healthy young men. We conducted a food intake test using two test meals, one high in organic phosphorus from organic food sources, and one high in inorganic phosphorus from food additives. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, phosphorus and calcium in the urine and blood, and phosphorus-related hormones were measured preprandial to 120 min postprandial. The results showed higher serum and urine phosphorus values after the high inorganic phosphorus meal, and a significant reduction in endothelium-dependent vasodilation at 30 min postprandial. These findings are evidence that inorganic phosphorus has a stronger influence on vascular-endothelium function than organic phosphorus.

KEYWORDS:

endothelial function; flow mediated dilation; food additive; inorganic phosphorus

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