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Enferm Intensiva. 2018 Jul - Sep;29(3):121-127. doi: 10.1016/j.enfi.2017.12.003. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Effect of a training programme on blood culture contamination rate in critical care.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Madrid, España.
2
Enfermería de Investigación, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Madrid, España. Electronic address: susana.arias@salud.madrid.org.
3
Consultorio Local Moraleja de Enmedio, Moraleja de Enmedio, Madrid, España.
4
Centro de Salud Parque Loranca, Fuenlabrada, Madrid, España.
5
Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario de Móstoles, Móstoles, Madrid, España.
6
Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, España.
7
Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Madrid, España.
8
Área de Medicina Intensiva, Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Getafe, Madrid, España.

Abstract

Blood culture contamination can occur from extraction to processing; its rate should not exceed 3%.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the impact of a training programme on the rate of contaminated blood cultures after the implementation of sample extraction recommendations based on the best evidence.

METHOD:

Prospective before-after study in a polyvalent intensive care unit with 18 beds. Two phases were established (January-June 2012, October 2012-October 2015) with a training period between them. Main recommendations: sterile technique, surgical mask, double skin disinfection (70° alcohol and 2% alcoholic chlorhexidine), 70° alcohol disinfection of culture flasks and injection of samples without changing needles. Including all blood cultures of patients with extraction request.

VARIABLES:

demographic, severity, pathology, reason for admission, stay and results of blood cultures (negative, positive and contaminated). Basic descriptive statistics: mean (standard deviation), median (interquartile range) and percentage (95% confidence interval). Calculated contamination rates per 100 blood cultures extracted. Bivariate analysis between periods.

RESULTS:

Four hundred and eight patients were included. Eight hundred and forty-one blood cultures were taken, 33 of which were contaminated. In the demographic variables, severity, diagnosis and stay of patients with contaminated samples, no differences were observed from those with uncontaminated samples. Pre-training vs post-training contamination rates: 14 vs 5.6 per 100 blood cultures extracted (P=.00003).

CONCLUSION:

An evidence-based training programme reduced the contamination of samples. It is necessary to continue working on the planning of activities and care to improve the detection of pollutants and prevent contamination of samples.

KEYWORDS:

Blood culture; Capacitación en servicio; Cuidados intensivos; Educación; Education; Hemocultivo; In-service training; Intensive care unit

PMID:
29609850
DOI:
10.1016/j.enfi.2017.12.003

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