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Cell. 2018 May 17;173(5):1111-1122.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.019. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

Fetal Neuropathology in Zika Virus-Infected Pregnant Female Rhesus Monkeys.

Author information

1
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
2
Computational Radiology Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
3
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Division of Anatomic Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
5
Alphagenesis, Yemassee, SC 29945, USA.
6
Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University, Covington, LA 70433, USA.
7
Bioqual, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.
8
Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.
9
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address: dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

The development of interventions to prevent congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) has been limited by the lack of an established nonhuman primate model. Here we show that infection of female rhesus monkeys early in pregnancy with Zika virus (ZIKV) recapitulates many features of CZS in humans. We infected 9 pregnant monkeys with ZIKV, 6 early in pregnancy (weeks 6-7 of gestation) and 3 later in pregnancy (weeks 12-14 of gestation), and compared findings with uninfected controls. 100% (6 of 6) of monkeys infected early in pregnancy exhibited prolonged maternal viremia and fetal neuropathology, including fetal loss, smaller brain size, and histopathologic brain lesions, including microcalcifications, hemorrhage, necrosis, vasculitis, gliosis, and apoptosis of neuroprogenitor cells. High-resolution MRI demonstrated concordant lesions indicative of deep gray matter injury. We also observed spinal, ocular, and neuromuscular pathology. Our data show that vascular compromise and neuroprogenitor cell dysfunction are hallmarks of CZS pathogenesis, suggesting novel strategies to prevent and to treat this disease.

KEYWORDS:

Zikavirus; neonate; neuropathology; non-human primate; placenta; pregnancy

PMID:
29606355
PMCID:
PMC5959775
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2018.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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