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Addict Behav. 2018 Sep;84:27-32. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.015. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Smoking-related health beliefs and smoking behavior in the National Lung Screening Trial.

Author information

1
Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, United States. Electronic address: kaufmana@mail.nih.gov.
2
Cape Fox Facilities Services, 7050 Infantry Ridge Road, Manassas, VA 20109, United States.
3
Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, United States.
4
Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, United States.
5
MGH/Harvard Medical School, 100 Cambridge Street, 16th Floor, Boston, MA 02114, United States.

Abstract

Understanding the association between smoking-related health beliefs and smoking cessation in the context of lung screening is important for effective cessation treatment. The purpose of the current study is to explore how current smokers' self-reported smoking-related health cognitions (e.g., self-efficacy) and emotions (e.g., worry) are related to cessation. This study utilized longitudinal data from current smokers (age 55-74) in a sub-study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST; 2002-2006; N = 2738). Logistic regression analyses examined associations of cessation at last assessment with smoking-related health cognitions and emotions, demographics, and two-way interactions among smoking-related health cognition and emotion variables, gender, and age. Over 37% (n = 1028) of smokers had quit at their last assessment of smoking status. Simple logistic regressions showed the likelihood of quitting was greater among participants reporting higher perceived severity of smoking-related diseases (OR = 1.17, p = .04), greater self-efficacy for quitting (OR = 1.32, p < .001), and fewer perceived barriers to quitting (OR = 0.82, p = .01). Likelihood of quitting was lower among non-Hispanic Black participants (versus non-Hispanic White participants) (OR = 0.68, p = .04) and higher among older participants (OR = 1.03, p = .002). Multiple logistic regression showed that participants reporting greater self-efficacy for quitting (B = 0.09, p = .05), fewer perceived barriers to quitting (B = -0.22, p = .01), and who were older (B = 0.03, p < .01) were more likely to quit smoking. These results suggest that, among heavy smokers undergoing lung screening, smoking-related health cognitions and emotions are associated with smoking cessation. These health beliefs must be considered an integral component of cessation in screening settings.

KEYWORDS:

Cessation; Cigarettes; Emotion; Health cognition; Lung screening; Smoker

PMID:
29605757
PMCID:
PMC6101245
[Available on 2019-09-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.03.015

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