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Environ Int. 2018 Jun;115:267-278. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.03.017. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals and risk of being born small for gestational age: Pooled analysis of seven European birth cohorts.

Author information

1
Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium. Electronic address: eva.govarts@vito.be.
2
Department of Contaminants, Diet and Microbiota, Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
3
Slovak Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Bratislava, Slovakia.
4
Department of Health and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain; Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain; Spanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus University Medical Centre-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
6
INSERM U1085 IRSET, Rennes, France.
7
Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium.
8
Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Department of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, USA.
10
Spanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Epidemiology and Environmental Health Joint Research Unit, FISABIO-Universitat Jaume I-Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
11
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, Spain; Health Research Institute, Biodonostia, San Sebastian, Spain.
12
Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona, Spain.
13
Spanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Servicio de Salud de las Islas Baleares (IB-Salut), Area de Salut de Menorca, Balearic Islands, Spain.
14
Spanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; Health Research Institute, Biodonostia, San Sebastian, Spain; Public Health Laboratory in Gipuzkoa, Basque Government, San Sebastian, Spain.
15
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
16
Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Division of Toxicology and Veterinary Pharmacology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
17
Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Public Health, Department of Environmental Medicine, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

There is evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have developmental effects at environmental concentrations. We investigated whether some EDCs are associated with the adverse birth outcome Small for Gestational Age (SGA).

METHODS:

We used PCB 153, p,p'-DDE, HCB, PFOS and PFOA measured in maternal, cord blood or breast milk samples of 5446 mother-child pairs (subset of 693 for the perfluorinated compounds) from seven European birth cohorts (1997-2012). SGA infants were those with birth weight below the 10th percentile for the norms defined by gestational age, country and infant's sex. We modelled the association between measured or estimated cord serum EDC concentrations and SGA using multiple logistic regression analyses. We explored effect modification by child's sex and maternal smoking during pregnancy.

RESULTS:

Among the 5446 newborns, 570 (10.5%) were SGA. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in PCB 153 was associated with a modestly increased risk of SGA (odds ratio (OR) of 1.05 [95% CI: 1.04-1.07]) that was stronger in girls (OR of 1.09 [95% CI: 1.04-1.14]) than in boys (OR of 1.03 [95% CI: 1.03-1.04]) (p-interaction = 0.025). For HCB, we found a modestly increased odds of SGA in girls (OR of 1.04 [95% CI: 1.01-1.07] per IQR increase), and an inverse association in boys (OR of 0.90 [95% CI: 0.85-0.95]) (p-interaction = 0.0003). Assessment of the HCB-sex-smoking interaction suggested that the increased odds of SGA associated with HCB exposure was only in girls of smoking mothers (OR of 1.18 [95% CI: 1.11-1.25]) (p-interaction = 0.055). Higher concentrations of PFOA were associated with greater risk of SGA (OR of 1.64 [95% CI: 0.97-2.76]). Elevated PFOS levels were associated with increased odds of SGA in newborns of mothers who smoked during pregnancy (OR of 1.63 [95% CI: 1.02-2.59]), while an inverse association was found in those of non-smoking mothers (OR of 0.66 [95% CI: 0.61-0.72]) (p-interaction = 0.0004). No significant associations were found for p,p'-DDE.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prenatal environmental exposure to organochlorine and perfluorinated compounds with endocrine disrupting properties may contribute to the prevalence of SGA. We found indication of effect modification by child's sex and smoking during pregnancy. The direction of the associations differed by chemical and these effect modifiers, suggesting diverse mechanisms of action and biological pathways.

KEYWORDS:

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs); Pooled analysis; Small for gestational age (SGA)

PMID:
29605679
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2018.03.017
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