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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2018 Feb 15;126:185-194. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2018.03.009. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Drug delivery to the lens for the management of cataracts.

Author information

1
Discipline of Pharmacy, School Health and Biomedical Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora, VIC 3083, Australia. Electronic address: thilini.thrimawithana@rmit.edu.au.
2
Buchanan Ocular Therapeutics Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, New Zealand National Eye Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.
3
Department of Physiology, New Zealand National Eye Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand.
4
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Lincoln University, P O Box 85084, New Zealand.

Abstract

Cataracts are one of the most prevalent diseases of the lens, affecting its transparency and are the leading cause of reversible blindness in the world. The clarity of the lens is essential for its normal physiological function of refracting light onto the retina. Currently there is no pharmaceutical treatment for prevention or cure of cataracts and surgery to replace the affected lens remains the gold standard in the management of cataracts. Pharmacological treatment for prevention of cataracts is hindered by many physiological barriers that must be overcome by a therapeutic agent to reach the avascular lens. Various therapeutic agents and formulation strategies are currently being investigated to prevent cataract formation as access to surgery is limited. This review provides a summary of recent research in the field of drug delivery to the lens for the management of cataracts including models used to study cataract treatments and discusses the future perspectives in the field.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidants; Cataracts; Glutathione; Implants; In vitro models; In vivo models; N-acetyl cysteine; N-acetylcarnosine; Topical delivery

PMID:
29604375
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2018.03.009

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