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G3 (Bethesda). 2018 May 4;8(5):1675-1686. doi: 10.1534/g3.118.200154.

A Whole Genome Assembly of the Horn Fly, Haematobia irritans, and Prediction of Genes with Roles in Metabolism and Sex Determination.

Author information

1
Texas A&M Institute for Genome Sciences and Society, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77845.
2
USDA-ARS Knipling-Bushland US Livestock Insects Research Laboratory and Veterinary Pest Genomics Center, Kerrville, Texas 78028 Felix.Guerrero@ars.usda.gov.
3
National Center for Genome Resources, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505.
4
Department of Immunology, University of Texas NGS Clinical Laboratory, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390.
5
Arbor Diagnostics Inc., Dallas, Texas 75229.
6
USDA-ARS Knipling-Bushland US Livestock Insects Research Laboratory and Veterinary Pest Genomics Center, Kerrville, Texas 78028.
7
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77845.
8
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77845.

Abstract

Haematobia irritans, commonly known as the horn fly, is a globally distributed blood-feeding pest of cattle that is responsible for significant economic losses to cattle producers. Chemical insecticides are the primary means for controlling this pest but problems with insecticide resistance have become common in the horn fly. To provide a foundation for identification of genomic loci for insecticide resistance and for discovery of new control technology, we report the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of the horn fly genome. The assembled genome is 1.14 Gb, comprising 76,616 scaffolds with N50 scaffold length of 23 Kb. Using RNA-Seq data, we have predicted 34,413 gene models of which 19,185 have been assigned functional annotations. Comparative genomics analysis with the Dipteran flies Musca domestica L., Drosophila melanogaster, and Lucilia cuprina, show that the horn fly is most closely related to M. domestica, sharing 8,748 orthologous clusters followed by D. melanogaster and L. cuprina, sharing 7,582 and 7,490 orthologous clusters respectively. We also identified a gene locus for the sodium channel protein in which mutations have been previously reported that confers target site resistance to the most common class of pesticides used in fly control. Additionally, we identified 276 genomic loci encoding members of metabolic enzyme gene families such as cytochrome P450s, esterases and glutathione S-transferases, and several genes orthologous to sex determination pathway genes in other Dipteran species.

KEYWORDS:

horn fly; metabolic resistance; pesticide resistance; sex determination genes

PMID:
29602812
PMCID:
PMC5940159
DOI:
10.1534/g3.118.200154
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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