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Am J Cardiol. 2018 Jun 1;121(11):1279-1284. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.02.006. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Circadian Distribution of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Different Age Groups.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gangdong Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Gwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
4
Heart Center of Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
5
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: mylovekw@hanmail.net.

Abstract

Many epidemiologic studies reported a morning peak in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, clinical outcomes and the relation between age distribution and circadian pattern have not been fully investigated in a large number of patients. Our study aimed to clarify the impacts of onset time in circadian variation on incidence and clinical outcomes of AMI according to age. From the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry, we gathered data of 20,685 patients from 53 centers in Republic of Korea. Data from a total of 19,915 patients (11,339 ST elevation myocardial infarction, 8,576 non-ST elevation myocardial infarction) were analyzed from the registry, after exclusion of diagnoses other than AMI. A morning-dominant incidence was shown by sinusoidal function, in all patients and in all separate age groups (age < 55, 55 ≤ age < 75, 75 ≤ age). In-hospital mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), including cardiac deaths, noncardiac deaths, recurrent myocardial infarction, repeated percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass graft at 1, 12, and 24 months' follow-up, were compared in 4 periods (00:00~05:59, 06:00~11:59, 12:00~17:59, and 18:00~23:59), and no significant difference was noted. Kaplan-Meier curve was drawn for death and MACE-free survival, and no significant different event-free survival was depicted (p value = 0.31). In conclusion, the incidences of myocardial infarction by onset time were uneven in 24 hours, in all patients and age groups, by sinusoidal function. However, there were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality or MACEs in the 4 time periods during 24 months of follow-up.

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