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Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2018 Apr;153(4):512-522. doi: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.015.

Incisor malalignment and the risk of periodontal disease progression.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: Abalsulaiman@iau.edu.sa.
2
Department of Health Policy and Health Service Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Mass.
3
School of Dentistry, University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Mich.
4
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, Mass.
5
Department of Periodontology, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Mass.
6
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Mass.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The objective of this study was to investigate the association between incisor crowding, irregularity, and periodontal disease progression in the anterior teeth.

METHODS:

Data collected over 35 years from men enrolled in the Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study included information concerning pocket depth and alveolar bone loss. Plaster casts of the maxillary (n = 400) and mandibular (n = 408) arches were available for baseline measurements. Periodontal disease in the anterior teeth was defined as per arch sum of pathologic pocket depth and sum of teeth with any alveolar bone loss in the anterior sextants. Incisor malalignment status was defined by the anterior tooth size-arch length discrepancy index and Little's Irregularity Index. Adjusted mixed effects linear models computed the beta (β) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of the amounts of change in periodontal disease outcomes by the level of malalignment.

RESULTS:

In the anterior maxillary arch, crowding and spacing were significantly associated with an increased per-arch sum of pathologic pocket depth (β, 0.70 mm; 95% CI, 0.20-1.21, and β, 0.49 mm; 95% CI, 0.06-0.91, respectively). In the anterior mandibular arch, incisor crowding and irregularity were significantly associated with an increased per-arch sum of pathologic pocket depth (mild crowding: β, 0.47 mm; 95% CI, 0.01-0.93; severe irregularity: β, 0.94 mm; 95% CI, 0.50-1.38), and the sum number of teeth with alveolar bone loss (mild and moderate-to-severe crowding: β, 0.45 teeth; 95% CI, 0.08-0.82; and β, 0.45 teeth; 95% CI, 0.13-0.83, respectively; moderate irregularity: β, 0.34 teeth; 95% CI, 0.06-0.62).

CONCLUSIONS:

Certain incisor malalignment traits (ie, maxillary incisor crowding, maxillary incisor spacing, mandibular incisor mild crowding, mandibular incisor moderate-to-severe crowding, mandibular incisor moderate irregularity, and mandibular incisor severe irregularity) are associated with significant periodontal disease progression.

PMID:
29602343
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajodo.2017.08.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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