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Neurocrit Care. 2018 Oct;29(2):189-194. doi: 10.1007/s12028-018-0523-y.

Fever Burden and Health-Related Quality of Life After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, 710 N Lake Shore Drive, 11th Floor, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. rabushmd@gmail.com.
2
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, 710 N Lake Shore Drive, 11th Floor, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fever is associated with worse functional outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); however, there are few prospective data to quantify the relationship with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We tested the hypothesis that increased burden of fever is independently associated with decreased HRQoL at follow-up.

METHODS:

In this prospective observational cohort study of 106 ICH patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital between 2011 and 2015, we recorded the highest core temperature each calendar day for 14 days after ICH onset. Fever burden was defined as the number of days with a fever ≥ 100.4 °F (38 °C). HRQoL outcomes were measured with Neuro-QoL domains of Cognitive Function and Mobility at 28 days, 3 months, and 1 year. Results were analyzed using mixed effects regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Each additional day with a fever was independently associated with lower Mobility HRQoL (T-score - 0.9, [- 1.6 to - 0.2]; p = 0.01) and Cognitive Function HRQoL (T-score - 1.3 [- 2.0 to - 0.6]; p = 0.001) after correction for National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission, age, and time to follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Each additional day with a fever was predictive of worse HRQoL domains of Cognitive Function and Mobility after ICH up to 1 year. These data extend previous evidence on the negative association of fever and functional outcomes to the domains of Cognitive Function and Mobility HRQoL. HRQoL outcomes may be a sensitive and powerful way to measure the efficacy of fever control in future research.

KEYWORDS:

Brain; Cerebral hemorrhage; Cognition; Critical care; Fever; Quality of life

PMID:
29600341
DOI:
10.1007/s12028-018-0523-y

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