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Sci Total Environ. 2018 Aug 15;633:641-648. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.108. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Ammonia oxidizers and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria respond differently to long-term manure application in four paddy soils of south of China.

Author information

1
College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, PR China.
2
Institute of Soil & Fertilizer and Resource & Environment, Jiangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanchang, Jiangxi, PR China.
3
Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu, PR China.
4
Soil and Fertilizer Institute of Hunan Province, Changsha, Hunan, PR China.
5
College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, PR China. Electronic address: liyongcn@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

Nitrification plays an important role in the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, and fertilizer application may influence soil nitrifiers' abundance and composition. However, the effect of long-term manure application in paddy soils on nitrifying populations is poorly understood. We chose four long-term manure experimental fields in the south of China to study how the abundance and community structure of nitrifiers would change in response to long-term manure application using quantitative PCR and Miseq sequencing analyses. Our results showed that manure application significantly increased ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) abundance at the ChangSha (CS) and NanChang (NC) sites, while the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) represented 4.8- and 12.8- fold increases at the JiaXing (JX) and YingTan (YT) sites, respectively. Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that manure application altered the community structure of nitrifying populations, especially at the NC and YT sites. The application of manure significantly changed AOA and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) community structures but not those of AOB, suggesting that AOA and NOB may be more sensitive to manures. Variation partitioning analysis (VPA) and redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that soil pH, TN, NO3--N and water content were the main factors in shaping nitrifying communities. These findings suggest that nitrifiers respond diversely to manure application, and soil physiochemical properties play an important role in determining nitrifiers' abundance and communities with long-term manure addition.

KEYWORDS:

Ammonia oxidizing archaea; Ammonia oxidizing bacteria; Manure; Nitrification; Nitrite oxidizing bacteria

PMID:
29597161
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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