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J Pharm Pract. 2019 Oct;32(5):503-508. doi: 10.1177/0897190018766944. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Pharmacists' Impact on Secondary Stroke Prevention.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients admitted to our institution with a cerebrovascular accident (stroke) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are referred to the pharmacist-run stroke prevention clinic (SPC) for medication and risk factor management.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to determine if patients receiving care from the SPC have better outcomes than patients who received usual care.

METHODS:

This was a retrospective chart review of patients referred to the SPC. At the time of stroke/TIA, before initial visit, and after last SPC visit, risk factor data was collected. Hospital readmissions were reviewed for secondary stroke/TIA, myocardial infarction (MI), and new or incidental peripheral artery disease (PAD). For patients that did not attend SPC visits, data was used as a control.

RESULTS:

Patients referred to the SPC from October 2012 to December 2014 were reviewed. 455 records were reviewed. The primary composite end point of readmission for stroke/TIA, myocardial infarction, and new or incidental PAD was statistically significantly lower in the SPC group than the control group (P = .013). All surrogate markers, including blood pressure, Low Density Lipoprotein, Hemoglobin A1c, and smoking status, improved in the SPC group.

CONCLUSION:

Pharmacists can play a role in reducing risk factors for secondary stroke/TIA and prevent future hospital admissions.

KEYWORDS:

ambulatory care; collaborative practice; medication management; secondary prevention; stroke prevention

PMID:
29591369
DOI:
10.1177/0897190018766944

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