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Science. 2018 Mar 9;359(6380):1151-1156. doi: 10.1126/science.aao5774.

Gut bacteria selectively promoted by dietary fibers alleviate type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism and Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China. lpzhao@sjtu.edu.cn pengyongde0908@126.com zhangchenhong@sjtu.edu.cn.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology and New Jersey Institute for Food, Nutrition, and Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, NJ 08901, USA.
3
State Key Laboratory of Microbial Metabolism and Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
4
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200080, China.
5
Sijing Community Health Service Center of Songjiang District, Shanghai 201601, China.
6
Sijing Hospital of Songjiang District, Shanghai 201601, China.
7
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Qidong People's Hospital, Jiangsu 226200, China.
8
Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200080, China.
9
Department of Laboratory Animal Science, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Army Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China.
10
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200080, China. lpzhao@sjtu.edu.cn pengyongde0908@126.com zhangchenhong@sjtu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The gut microbiota benefits humans via short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from carbohydrate fermentation, and deficiency in SCFA production is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We conducted a randomized clinical study of specifically designed isoenergetic diets, together with fecal shotgun metagenomics, to show that a select group of SCFA-producing strains was promoted by dietary fibers and that most other potential producers were either diminished or unchanged in patients with T2DM. When the fiber-promoted SCFA producers were present in greater diversity and abundance, participants had better improvement in hemoglobin A1c levels, partly via increased glucagon-like peptide-1 production. Promotion of these positive responders diminished producers of metabolically detrimental compounds such as indole and hydrogen sulfide. Targeted restoration of these SCFA producers may present a novel ecological approach for managing T2DM.

PMID:
29590046
DOI:
10.1126/science.aao5774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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